Tag Archives: Age of Sigmar

Ghouls Just Wanna Have Fun – Part 1

I’ve been inclined to poke around the odd graveyard lately, turning over the carcasses and looking for snacks. Unsurprisingly that’s got me looking at the Grymwatch set of models, which I picked up as part of a scheme to put together a ghoulish Warcry warband (much in the same vein as I used Ironskullz boys – also from Warhammer Underwear – to make an Orc warband). Some readers may recall that I used one of them to create a nasty-looking jester back in November of last year.

Now he’s joined by a few more cannibals, starting with this hook-handed gentleman.

Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (4)Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (5)Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)

Alongside him we have the first lady-ghoul that I can remember seeing from GW. This is probably my favourite model in the warband, in fact she’s pretty much worth the price by herself, and she proved to be great fun to paint as well.

Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (8)Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (6)Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (7)

Thirdly we have a pair of unfortunate, mistreated bats. Bats get a bit of a rough press at times, which is unfortunate as they’re really quite brilliant little creatures, which do no harm to anyone, yet which are branded with all kinds of silly supposititious nonsense by people who really ought to know better. Remember, the same people who flap and scream that bats are poisonous and out to get them are also allowed to drive cars, have children and vote.

It’s also not a good idea to eat them, as this is likely to be a source of infections crossing from wild animals to humans, something which could potentially lead to a global pandemic and massive loss of life, as well as social and economic devastation. Thankfully people listen to experts rather than just making things up as they go along and as a result has remained a purely hypothetical scenario – global pandemics being very much a thing of the past now and unlikely to occur in any of our lifetimes…

Anyway, there are some bats in the grymwatch set (because obviously if you’re not scared by the corpse-eating cannibals then some nocturnal insectivorous mammals should be enough to give you the heeby-geebies) and I thought they’d make a nice thematic stand in to replace a fury in Flesh-Eater Courts Warcry warband.

Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (3)Ghouls AoS Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)

The poor bats don’t seem to be having a terribly good time of things, for one thing they’ve been chained together, and chained to a headless corpse, with the chains looped through the delicate membranes of their wings which seems rather convoluted and cruel. Then again the Flesh-Eater Courts are already quixotic cannibals who tilt at innocent civilians rather than windmills so why not torment innocent bats as well? Either way they were quite fun to paint and between them these three models have me thinking about my ghoulish warband again so I might tackle some more soon. Maybe one of the big monsters, or perhaps some more ghouls? (Grym)watch this space! (I’ll get my coat…).


A Right Pile Of Potential

Earlier today I was looking through some of the blogs that I follow, sipping at my coffee and looking blearily out at the world around me much in the manner of a hibernating mammal forced out of its den. Some people start the day with the news but I like to have at least a pint of the black stuff (coffee for those times when Guinness isn’t socially appropriate) before I dare to expose myself to that much rage and misery, so I turn my attention instead to what, if anything, my fellow hobbyists have managed to produce overnight. In this case it was this post from Scent of a Gamer which caught my attention and got me thinking about something which I’ve considered writing about for some time – “The Pile of Shame vs the Pile of Potential”. I started to write a comment in reply and it grew and grew into something so sprawling and lengthy that I decided to post it here instead.

Firstly allow me to recommend, if you haven’t already, that you take a look at that post on Scent of a Gamer and indeed the blog in general – it’s well worth reading at the best of times and this post is very much a reply to it. We’re talking, to quote davekay himself, about “something every wargamer has: the pile of shame. Those unpainted miniatures bought on impulse or with intent years ago, but never touched”.

Unpainted Miniatures

He also links to a video by Goobertown hobbies which isn’t a channel I’ve watched before, in which the presenter digs through a (vast) collection of unpainted miniatures looking for something which takes his fancy to paint – a process which I’m sure will be familiar to many of us. I’ll confess that I didn’t watch all of the video, there’s only so long you can look at a man showing off how many miniatures he’s bought over the years whilst listening to elevator muzak, but I enjoyed what I saw and I’ll take a nose at the rest of his channel when time allows.

I’ll admit too that I had a moment of being “triggered” (as da yoof would have it) into a brief rage when he produced a copy of the Looncurse box out of his stash – a box I myself craved as the start of my long-planned Sylvaneth army, with a whole heap of lovely Night Goblins thrown in for good measure. Looncurse famously sold out in next to no time and I missed out, so it was damn annoying to see someone else proudly admitting to having snagged a copy and not even touched it. On the other hand, I realised with a growing sense of discomfort, I picked up various other kits at around the same time which I’ve yet to do anything with so could I honestly say I wouldn’t have neglected my own copy in just the same way?

Looncurse

This isn’t the first time I’ve had the pile of shame on my mind lately. In fact, a recent inventory of my unpainted collecting revealed a worrying fact – there’s a hell of a lot of it. Years of bargain hunting and snapping up good deals have taken their toll and the “to paint” pile has grown into a mountain large enough to influence the local climate. By my rough count, assuming that I keep painting at my current rate (something I wouldn’t bet on by any means) it’d still take me several years to clear the backlog. Add to that the forthcoming releases for Necromunda and Warcry, the new Space Marines (which would go very nicely with my existing collection), the new Necrons (and you know I’ve always thought a Necron army would be cool…), the mate who’s slowly but surely convincing me to try out Bolt Action, and whatever else emerges over the coming months and years and it starts to feel as though the lead mountain and the grey tide are very much here to stay.

Necron

Resistance is futile!

I don’t like the term “pile of shame” very much. Shame is a terrible emotion, and rarely one that inspires us to action. Excitement and enthusiasm is what gets us to pick up the brushes, whilst shame and embarrassment put us off, killing the joy that our hobbies are intended to engender and starving us off the passion that would otherwise help to overcome the unpainted masses.

At the end of the day miniatures are there to be enjoyed. A particularly good game can stay in the memory for years, even decades. There are plenty of ways of making that happen of course, and for me some of the most memorable contained no painted miniatures at all (indeed in a few cases no models were involved, just blank bases with post-it note labels to tell us what was what and a whole load of imagination). However it’s a fairly safe generalisation to make that well painted miniatures on thematic terrain will stick with us longer than unpainted models on a bare kitchen table. Add to that the fact that “check out this model I painted” is a far more engaging conversation starter than “check out this stuff I just bought and will now shove under the bed and never touch or look at again for as long as I live” and we find ourselves drawn to an inevitable conclusion; our hobby ought to have as its crux the collecting and painting of miniatures. A large number of us however would be hard-pressed to deny that our hobby is collecting unpainted models, with assembling, painting and gaming a sideline at best.

Ogre

Why won’t you paint me? I’m so beautiful…

On the other hand I really don’t like the term “pile of potential” either. The implication is very much that ending up with lots and lots of unpainted models is something to be celebrated, that buying things and then never painting them is inherently a good thing to do. This is quite a comforting idea, after all I have lots of unpainted models already, and there are new things that I’d like to own, and I’d far rather be telling myself that adding to this great mountain of plastic and lead and sitting on it like Smaug is something to be proud of. However I can’t shake the feeling that actually it’s just profligate, that all I’m doing is showing off how much money I would have had in the bank if I hadn’t squandered it instead on miniatures that I’m not painting.

I know that I’m not just speaking for myself here, I’m also undoubtedly addressing something that a lot of my readers will be very familiar with from their own collections, and I’m not trying to make anyone feel bad. After all we’re not really doing much harm, we’re not selling drugs, stabbing grannies or mismanaging the national response to a pandemic, we’re just hoarding bits of plastic. On the other hand I’ve never looked at a miniature and thought “I’d love to store that somewhere and be vaguely embarrassed that it’s cluttering up my house”. Quite the opposite in fact, I want to paint them, perhaps even play with them.

So how to go about it? Well there are a few tricks that have helped me over the years. Firstly, although I’m an occasional gamer at best, planning a game in advance is a great motivator to get something finished. I’ve boosted Necromunda gangs, Warcry warbands and the contents of Blackstone Fortress over the finish line using exactly this method.

Then there’s the old “model a month” trick. Some readers will already be familiar with this, as I’ve described it often enough in the past, but for anyone who’s not encountered it the premise is simple; paint at least one miniature for a project every month (for a year, or until it’s done – it’s up to you really). Now one model isn’t very much, especially when you’re dealing with a horde army like the Skaven (as I was). However Newton’s First Law of Motion can be applied here; Objects in motion tend to remain in motion, objects at rest remain at rest. If you’re painting one clanrat it’s easy enough to paint a second or perhaps even a third, and then your enthusiasm for Skaven is rekindled, you remember what it was about the project that made you want to paint hundreds of the little bastards in the first place, you get some more work done on the warp-lightning cannon whilst you’re waiting for the shade to dry and the whole project keeps shambling forward. Leave them sitting, allow them to gather dust, push them to the side of the desk and finally pack them away and months, then years will go past without so much as a kiss of a brush upon a ratty whisker. By applying this method I went from this (at the beginning of January 2017)…

… to this (at the end of December 2019).

Another trick I’ve been applying recently is simply to keep track of exactly what I’ve added to the collection. I keep a note of what I’ve bought each month and I check it before I buy anything else. For one thing this is just sensible fiscal prudence, but more than that it helps to remind me of all the things I was really excited about before I saw the thing I’m currently really excited about. More than that I also keep a note of all the models I’ve painted this month as well, and I aim (although of course I don’t always succeed) to make the latter number bigger than the former. It’s early days yet, I’ve only been doing this for a few months, but so far it’s helped me a great deal in keeping on top of the “pile of unrealised projects” and even helped me chip away at it a little, so I may come back to it and talk about it more in the future if it proves to be useful in the long term.

Finally, the most valuable tip I ever received was “paint what you’re passionate about”. If you’re excited about painting something then get on and paint it. If you want to paint something you’ll find the time to paint it, and if you don’t want to paint it you’ll find an excuse. Enthusiasm for a project will do far more to get you painting than all the tips, tricks and tutorials in the world and when that enthusiasm inevitably drains away to be replaced by something else you’ll have done a lot more than if you didn’t act on it.

Do you have a pile of shameful potential, and if so how do you tackle it? As usual if you have words of wisdom to share I want to hear all about them and the comments box is open to all comers.


Dat Der Iz Da Dokk!

Remember the Bonesplitters WardokkI built just a couple of weeks or so ago? In startling turn of speed (bolstered by my enthusiasm for all things greenskinned and a surge of Waaagh! energy racing through my paintbrush) I’ve only gone and painted him up.

Wardokk Wudugast ConvertorDie Orc (2)Wardokk Wudugast ConvertorDie Orc (3)Wardokk Wudugast ConvertorDie Orc (1)

I’ve been promising myself that I’m going to tackle my Cawdor gang for Necromunda for a loooong time so I’m going to take a stab at them next but I’ve really enjoyed this little excursion into fantasy greenskins so expect to see some more in the near-ish future.


Gonna Smash ’em – Part 1

Ever since I painted up Ironskull’s Boyz last month I’ve had an itch to paint some more greenskins. I’ve also been thinking about doing more with Warcry. I’m already chipping away at the terrain required for more varied games but it occurred to me that, with the addition of a few new recruits, Ironskull’s Boyz could themselves be the basis for another little warband.

With that in mind I had a look around for some more orcs with which to bolster the ranks. First to come to hand was this Black Orc, nowadays known as an Ardboy. Incidentally I still find Ardboyz a bit confusing because when I were a lad Ardboyz were in 40k and now they no longer appear in the Ork codex and instead the same name has been used for the heavily armoured rank and file of the Ironjaws. As for the models themselves the old Black Orcs kit was one of my favourites in the WHFB Orcs and Goblins range so I’m glad that they survived into the Age of Sigmar, even though there’s very little aesthetically to link them to the bulkier, cruder looking Brutes (more on them below). A unit that shared aesthetic elements with both Ardboys and Brutes would be a fine addition to the Ironjaws range I feel. That said I’m always amused that the Black Orcs, which used to be the biggest and ‘ardest boyz around, now look so little and desperate to please next to the lumbering Brutes.

Anyway here he is, massive axe in hand and ready to join his clanmates as they enter the Bloodwind Spoil in search of a propa scrap.

Ardboy Wudugast ConvertOrDie Orc (1)Ardboy Wudugast ConvertOrDie Orc (3)Ardboy Wudugast ConvertOrDie Orc (2)

He’s something of a rescue job, I’ve had him for a long time and he’s been battered around a lot over the years, part painted on several occasions, used – briefly – in the conversion of a 40k Ardboy, and now returned to his fantasy roots. All this means that getting him to look good took a fair amount of effort, and the results are not what I like to think they would have been if I’d just started with a freshly assembled and completely unpainted model, but I’m happy enough with the way he’s turned out in the end and he holds up fairly well next to his buddy from Ironskull’s Boyz.

Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (1)

As if this wasn’t enough muscle I decided to throw in even more in the form of two Brutes. Back when the Brutes were released I gave them a fairly lukewarm review but time has softened my heart and nowadays they rank amongst my favourite AoS models, so including a couple of them in the warband was an opportunity not to be missed. For sheer brutality you can’t beat the imaginatively titled jagged gore-hacka so that was my first port of call.

Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (6)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (7)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (8)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (9)

Next allow me to swiftly retract my previous statement, it turns out there is something even more vicious and over-the-top looking than even the gore-hacka, the gore-choppa. This weapon alone would have been enough to sell me on the brutes kit and there was never the slightest possibility that I would fail to include one.

Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (2)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (3)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (4)Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (5)

With both models I left off some of the chest armour and used greenstuff to cover over the resultant gaps. That allowed me to replace their heads with suitably mean looking alternatives, the one on the left comes from the (now sadly out of production) Boarboyz, the one on the right from the Flash Gitz.

Brutes Wudugast Orcs ConvertOrDie AoS (1)

Combine these three newcomers with the orcs from Ironskulls Boyz  and the warband is complete and ready to spread mayhem and destruction wherever they go. Chaos warriors beware!

Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (2)

Scattered around the painting desk are a few more brutes which I’m yet to build, plus some Ardboys and other Orc-y characters (hence the “Part 1” in the title) so I’ll aim to tackle some more green lads soon.


Amid The Ruins – Part 4

The ramshackle streets of Carngrad continue to grow. I’m still working my way through my Warcry terrain, a little bit at a time. This belltower proved to be a right nightmare to paint if I’m honest but I’m happy enough with the results (in that I didn’t give up altogether and take myself off in a sulk!).

It’s one of those pieces that I might well have pushed to the side of the painting desk and studiously ignored for a few months, but the Sixty Day Miniatures Of Magnitude challenge from Ann’s Immaterium came along at just the right moment.  Calling on participants to tackle the bigger items in our backlogs it gave me the push I needed to get my head down and finish the damn thing, despite the temptation to cry off, so thanks are owed to Ann there. Anyone else in a similar situation should give the challenge a look, it’s open to anything bigger than an ogre and you’ve got until the 3rd of July to tackle it.

Belltower AoS Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)Belltower AoS Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)Belltower AoS Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie (3)Belltower AoS Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie (4)

By my eye, and I may be jinxing myself of course, I think that was the hardest of the ruins to paint so it should get easier again from here. Then again I can’t quite put my finger on why I found it so tricky – apart from that the skeletons were a little fiddly. Either way I’m planning to get torn in about the rest of the ruins soon and finish off the set, then turn my attention to making some chaos-warped terrain of my own.


Iz Dat Da Dokk?

Let’s be honest, some miniatures are just a bit duff. Take the Bonesplitters Wardokk for instance (which used to be a Savage Orc shaman of some description). Let’s not beat about the bush, it’s past its best. In fact, it’s hard to say exactly when it’s best was…

Wardokk

For those unfamiliar the Wardokk is essentially an assistant shaman amongst the Bonesplitters. This faction of Orcs are lead by cabals of savage mystics, with a Wurrgog Prophet (the model for which, confusingly, used to be the special character Wurrzag, Da Great Green Prophet – something I still find takes a little getting used to). Each Wurrgog Prophet has a few acolytes around to assist in imposing his orders (however mad they may sound) on the recalcitrant boyz, to whip the clan up ready for battle and to perform the secret dances by which they channel the power of the greenskin god. One of these so-called Wardokks will go on to become the Wurrgog’s successor, to quote the army book, “should the Prophet fall in battle or accidentally blow himself up”.

At first I found myself wondering why GW continue to give the Wardokk miniature a place in the ranks of the Orc (or should I say Orruk) Warclans range. There’s no denying it’s letting the side down a little, when compared with some of the brilliant models that march alongside it. However after giving it some thought I came to realise that actually they made a smart move here. Keeping the Wardokk around adds another option to the range, and kitbashing your own version from the Bonesplitters set, plus a few odds and ends, is actually pretty straightforward and a lot of fun.

Wardokk WIP Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)Wardokk WIP Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)Wardokk WIP Wudugast ConvertOrDie (3)Wardokk WIP Wudugast ConvertOrDie (4)Wardokk WIP Wudugast ConvertOrDie (5)

The key elements to capture were the skull mask (taken from the Ironjaws Brutes), the dancing pose and the bone-fetish rattle (made from bits and bobs in the savage orcs kit, rather than wire wool as the original appears to have been). The army book describes how the Wardokk will do whatever is required to get the boys in a fighting mood (surely not that hard) including, but not limited to, a quick punch in the face – something I thought the clenched fist on his free hand conveyed rather well. I might raise him up on something to make him stand out a little amongst any future boyz but otherwise I’m pretty pleased with him (although as ever I’m open to any and all feedback). In fact he was so straightforward to build that I’m now feeling tempted to make a couple more – the book does describe multiple Wardokks in each clan after all. Not sure when I’ll get around to painting him but he was great fun to make, and he’s certainly given me the itch to tackle some more green boys soon.


War Eternal – Part 9

You may recall that during the summer of 2019 I chipped away at an Age of Sigmar skirmish warband dedicated to the Blood God Khorne. By the time I wrapped up the project I’d painted seven bloodreavers and if I’m honest I was never very comfortable leaving them there. The holy number of Khorne is eight and so leaving the squad on just seven members seemed like foolishness and guaranteed to bring down the ire of the war god upon my luckless head. However painting one bloodreaver seemed equally daft when I could paint three and round out a squad of ten.

Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (6)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (7)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (8)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (9)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (3)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (4)Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (5)

Here’s the three new boys ready to start rampaging with their new mates.

Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (10)

And here’s the whole squad ready to reap skulls for their god’s famously uncomfortable chair.

Khorne Bloodreavers Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)

Once again I’m not sure when I’m going to get back to this project but I do have more ideas, it’s really just a matter of time…


Ironskullz Boys

I’ve never been particularly enthused by Warhammer Underworlds as a game, I’m not that keen on card games and the tagline “The Ultimate Competitive Miniatures Game” is kryptonite to the likes of me who leans more towards enjoying myself and socialising if dice are getting rolled at all, rather than engaging in cut-throat, win-at-all-costs competition. That said the miniatures are pretty damn gorgeous so I picked up Ironskullz Boys just for the fun of painting them (which after all if the mainstay of my hobby anyway – gaming barely makes it into the top ten reasons I do this at the best of times).

Despite how much I love these four miniatures I couldn’t resist making a few minor tweaks and adjustments. Boss-man Gurzag Ironskull got a new head which I reckon makes him look even fiercer (and more of a show-off) than the original, and also makes him uniquely mine.

Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (5)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (4)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (6)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (7)

Likewise his sidekick Bonekutta got a new head – with a helmet, which I think emphasises his brutish power and strength.

Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (8)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (9)

The other two ‘ard boyz in the warband, Basha and Hakka, were pretty much perfect as is, in my opinion, so I left them well alone.

Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (3)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (10)Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (11)

And here we have them, my first ever Underworld’s Warband, ready for action in case anyone ever decides to convince me to become a ruthless power-gamer!

Ironskullz Boyz Orcs Wudugast ConvertOrDie (12)

I must confess that since painting these the itch to tackle some more greenskins is back. I’ve got a Blood Bowl team I’m meant to be painting, and there’s always a need for more Orks in my 40k collection so watch this space.


Ulthuan Lives!

Until now I’ve never painted a high elf. It’s not something I’m famous for per se, people don’t point me out in the street, nudging their friends and saying “there goes the man who’s never painted a high elf” but it is something I spoken about in the past, usually in connection with my typically dirty, grimy painting style. War is a famously filthy business, with lots of tramping through mud and dust interspersed with occasionally being splattered with blood and other fluids and I tend to reflect that in my miniatures. I enjoy seeing armies that are beautifully painted in parade-ground uniforms but for me it’s not done until it’s dirty. Thus the high elves, which are famed for being clean and bright have often been used as an example of something I don’t or wouldn’t paint.

On the other hand I don’t tend to see not having done something as a mark of pride. You meet people, for example, who will boast about the films or TV shows they haven’t seen, books they haven’t read, and so on, and I must admit I find that rather odd. Trying something and not enjoying it is fair enough, or not getting around to seeing or doing something because there’s only so much time in the day. It’s not doing something and treating this as a great achievement and a mark of specialness that I find odd. I haven’t found it to be a constant daily battle to restrain my unhealthy compulsion to paint high elves and as a result I don’t feel I deserve to be congratulated for it.

Anyway, enough waffle, the point I’m driving at (rather laboriously!) is that I’ve painted one now – here’s a Swordmaster of Hoeth for your enjoyment.

High Elf Wudugast ConvertOrDie (1)High Elf Wudugast ConvertOrDie (2)

I’m quite pleased with the blue-tinge on the sword (just a straightforward coat of Grey Knights Steel with a highlight) but it really doesn’t show up well in the picture from the front. You can see it a bit better in the shot from behind though.

This isn’t the start of a new project, I just realised it was something I’d often said that I’d never done and decided that now was as good a time as any other to change that. That said I do have a few more, which I got as part of the Island Of Blood boxset that accompanied the release of WHFB 8th Edition (which I bought for all the lovely Skaven of course) so who knows, if people start nudging each other in the street and saying “there goes the man who’s only ever painted one High Elf” I might just be forced to break out some more…


Iron Golem – Part 4

Time to tackle the final two members of the current Iron Golem gang; the Drillmaster and Prefector. I’ve also managed to rustle up a Signifer (more on him below) but we’ll need to wait to see him painted. The other two however are complete, and with that the warband is ready to take on the violent world of the Bloodwind Spoil.

First up, the Drillmaster. If I can offer a criticism of Warcry it’s the lack of background fiction for the individuals that make up the each warband. I can see that the Iron Legionaries are the rank and file, the professional soldiers which guard the artisans (if such a word can be used) that make up the rest of the gang. The Armator is clearly a dwarf, and therefore most likely a skilled metalworker who brings his talents to the rest of the group as they ply their trade as smiths. The Breacher is an Ogre that the others have “convinced” to join them, before welding hammers to his hands and pointing him at the enemy. So far so good. But what about the Drillmaster? Is she the commander of the Iron Legionaries, fulfilling a role similar to a sergeant perhaps? Does she have some kind of specialist function away from the battlefield that I’ve yet to fathom? Is she a dab hand at dentistry? These are the aspects I’d love to know just a little more about but alas, so far, Warcry has tended to skim over them, and that’s a real pity.

Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (4)Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (5)Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (6)

Again, it’s not immediately obvious what the Prefector’s role is, but I presume they’re some kind of champion, acting as a second in command to the Dominar. Whatever his job is for my money he’s the coolest looking model in the warband, packed with attitude from top to toe.

Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (2)Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (3)

The alternative build to the Prefector is the Signifer. Usually you can only get one or the other from a set but I scrounged around online and managed to nab myself a second one. Although I’ve built him I suspect it’ll be a while before I manage to get him painted.

Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (1)

In the meantime however here’s the whole warband as they stand currently.

Iron Golem Warcry Wudugast ConvertOrDie AoS (7)

We even managed to get a game in over the weekend, which proved to be great fun. The Untamed Beasts, commanded by my partner, romped home to victory (turns out paying attention to the rules and remembering the objectives pays dividends, although it would have been handy if a run of bad dice rolls hadn’t seen my Ogre Breacher waving his fists ineffectually at all and sundry). Of course in the cut and thrust of high-stakes combat we only remembered to take one picture!

Warcry

As for what comes next I really want to get the rest of the Warcry terrain painted up, and then probably start another warband knowing me, and naturally I’m feeling the pull of Necromunda as strongly as ever, and I want to get back to my Blackstone Fortress heroes, and a dozen or so other projects as well. Watch this space!