Untamed Beasts – Part 2

Following on the heels of my first few Untamed Beasts we have the warband’s First Fang. Unlike the others I really didn’t like this model too much in its original incarnation, the downward pointing harpoon lacked aggression, the axe looked too big and heavy and I wasn’t mad about the helmet either. I did a fair bit of chin scratching over what to do with the axe but in the end I decided to make my life easy for once and just leave it alone. I did however adjust the angle of the arm, so that he appears to be launching the harpoon at a distant enemy rather than poking listlessly at one lying near his feet. With this new pose I think the axe works better as well, counter-balancing his weight as he hefts the harpoon into the air. I also gave him a headswap for one which looked a bit more tribal and belligerent and a bit less supercilious and bored.

Warcry Wudugast First Fang Untamed Beasts (1)Warcry Wudugast First Fang Untamed Beasts (2)Warcry Wudugast First Fang Untamed Beasts (3)

Here’s a quick reminder of how the studio model looks for comparison.

With the warband starting to take shape my next move is probably going to be finishing off some of the terrain I’ve started (and at some point I’ll need to turn my attention to their Iron Golem adversaries as well).


19 responses to “Untamed Beasts – Part 2

  • imperialrebelork

    Cool man. Good choice on the head swap. I really like that big boned weapon.

    • Wudugast

      Cheers mate! I won’t make any comedy remarks about a man with a big bone! I do actually really like that weapon, I just think it’s too large for the model – they should have made the weapon smaller or used it on an orc or something instead. Now I’ve tweaked him a bit I don’t really mind it though.

  • theimperfectmodeller

    Great being able to see the figure before and after, enables me to appreciate the work done on the conversion. I could have lived with the original harpoon position but not the original head. The new head looks much better but its angle meant changing the harpoon angle then became a must. End result is a much better figure. Very nicely painted too and another great addition.

    • Wudugast

      Thanks very much. I need to try and remember to include pictures of the original models alongside my converted versions where I can, I know it would be helpful for anyone not familiar with the original version.

      The original head would be fine on a solider of some kind but it really doesn’t work on a savage tribesman. Likewise the downward angled harpoon would be fine in and of itself but there’s nothing about it that suggests dynamic action and that’s really what I was going for. Glad you like him – there’s more on their way! 🙂

  • Alex

    Brilliant – your deft conversions have improved this model no end, and the paint job is lovely (as always). I really like the banded colouring on the fur cloak! Really smart mate 🙂

    • Wudugast

      Cheers! It didn’t take much but I reckon it’s made a big difference. Quite pleased with the fur myself, makes me think of some huge stripy predator that these guys have hunted down.

  • Pete S/ SP

    That looks really great.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

  • Mikko

    Excellent conversion work! He goes from looking like a gladiator to a tribal chieftain with a few clever changes.

    • Wudugast

      Thank you! You’re right, the original looked very gladiatorial, some elements would have fitted in better with the new Spire Tyrants (which are awesome in my opinion, can’t wait to get my mitts on them!). For this one however I wanted something much more feral 😀

  • patmcf

    I love it mate , totally agree with the change of position ,well done ,is it difficult to change you kind of figures ? mine I have to boil in water so as I’m able to bend them to a new position and then plunge them into cold but I cant see that working with yours !
    I like the idea of trying to remember to pop up an original photo ! I only think of it after all has been completed !!!

    • Wudugast

      Thank you! Converting plastic models is fairly straightforward in principle, it depends what you’re aiming to do of course. In this case the arm and the body are separate components so it was just a case of shaving a bit off from the point where the arm meets the body to change the angle, dry-fitting it to check how it looks and then repeating until you end up with something you’re happy with. My main problem is remembering to cut the right way, more than once I’ve adjusted the angle of the join in the wrong direction and accentuated the element I was trying to cover up. Doh!

      Of course the versatility of plastic for converting means there’s always a temptation to do more than I would have dared with metal, which on the one hand is very liberating but on the other hand leads to tackling far more complex challenges and making even more work for myself! Converting metal models is a whole different kettle of fish, my hat is off to anyone who does that. Cut my teeth doing that when I was younger and I’m glad I don’t do it very often now (maybe I would have done better if I hadn’t been using my teeth of course…).

      • patmcf

        That’s interesting mate I must have a closer look at the type of figures you do when I’m next in IROs shop he introduced me to as for converting metal ones 🥴no way would I even think of doing it .

Speak, damn you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: