Get Sick Or Die Trying – Part 11

Did I not promise you more poxwalkers just a week ago? Am I not a corpse master of my word? Here’s the latest two shamblers to come lurching off the painting desk.

I experimented quite a lot with this one, mixing some of the agrellan earth texture paint in with flesh tones to cover some of the rougher joins. I actually finished him off about a week ago but I found myself really unhappy with the results. Although he was technically pretty much perfect the results were much too “clean” for my liking (by which I mean painted with precision, he still looked like a filthy rotten git). In the end I took him back to the painting desk and worked over him, he’s muckier now but I’m much happier with the end result.

poxwalkers convert or die wudugast (4)

His new pal here is converted from the poxwalker in the lab coat.

poxwalkers convert or die wudugast (2)poxwalkers convert or die wudugast (3)

Unlike the previous lab coat wearing poxwalker I painted I didn’t use lots of blood splatter here, but instead tried to make the coat look stained and befouled by decomposition. By way of comparison here he is next to his gore covered colleague.

poxwalkers convert or die wudugast (1)

Of course without getting too graphic it’s clear that his guts have exploded quite violently at some point, which presumably means he wasn’t wearing the lab coat at the time. It builds a somewhat macabre image, in my mind at least, of him, already long dead, taking his coat from its hook and, in a reverse of his habits in life, putting it on before he shambled out of the lab for the final time.


19 responses to “Get Sick Or Die Trying – Part 11

  • Mikko

    These look horrible. In other words, great job on them. I like the little narrative idea of wearing a nice lab coat out of habit post mortem!

  • Alex

    Gruesome! I like what you did with the Agrellan Earth texture paint mate, that has worked really well!

    • Wudugast

      Cheers – it really did a lot to tidy up the joins and add some much needed texture. It wouldn’t work on everything but it’s a useful trick to have up my sleeve for Nurgle 🙂

  • Alexis West

    More good stuff! The head and hand swaps actually work to make the two in labcoats look like they’ve got significantly different poses.

    • Wudugast

      I’m really pleased with how dissimilar they’ve ended up looking despite coming from the same base model. There’s a third one of the lab-coat set still to wrap up and I think it’s going to be the most different looking of the lot (fingers crossed!)

      • Andrew Kerssens

        I am wondering what you did to get the lab coat like that? I have a really hard time making white look good. Can you give a quick step by step on the coat?

      • Wudugast

        You’re making me think now, it was over a year ago and I’m terrible for not writing down recipes. White is a tricky one for me too (I’ve often dreamed of a White Scars army but I’m not daft enough to put myself through that kind of torment!). I will have started with a good solid base of Ulthuan grey (my go-to for anything white, since I discovered how useful it is I’ve found painting white much easier). Then I will have built up layers of Ulthuan Grey mixed with Palid Wytch Flesh. The other thing I find tricky with white is any errors are quite obvious, the eye is drawn by any little imperfections (which there will always be because this is being painted by flawed human beings like you and I – I don’t know about you but whilst I salute those Golden Daemon winners who spend 300hours highlighting white but I’ve got other things to be doing!). I think the traditional way to overcome that is to take plenty of care, extra time, lots of thin layers etc etc – but in this example all the staining and weathering did the job, the eye is drawn to all those “deliberate imperfections” (the dirt and staining from the washes I applied) rather than any flaws in the white underneath. Think about a white sheet of paper with a little dust on it. The eye is drawn to the dust because it’s the only dark on the otherwise blank white sheet. Then someone draws a picture on it – now the eye is drawn to the image and the dust fades into the background (another example would be the pencil guidelines an artist might use which they’ll then work over in charcoal or ink). Likewise any flaws in the highlighting of the white are overlooked because the eye is confused (for want of a better term) by the surrounding dirt and weathering. Hope that helps 🙂

  • Pete S/ SP

    Love them- they look great.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

  • Maurice Micklewhite

    There’s always something pleasant about going back to a model and scuzzing it up and making it look a lot more grubby.

  • Faust

    Nice work on those, love pox #1. It’s unfortunate the lab coats are identical. Are they from the same boxed set? I think I would try to add new holes or cover some of the existing ones, so they don’t look so similar. Your reposing of #2 turned out really nice though, and makes him look different just by pose and parts though.

    • Wudugast

      Yeah, it’s unfortunate that the lab coats are identical (it’s the same base model – the old one is as it comes, the new one is kitbashed). I did wonder about greenstuffing over them but if you change the pose, the head, the weapons and the colour-scheme the rest fades into the background somewhat, especially in a 40-strong horde. 🙂

  • Azazel

    Ah – nice ideas here. I’ll keep these in mind when I get to those Poxwalkers. I found one of those bags today, too!

  • heresyofus

    Cool! Love a few Poxwalkers. They are quite handy models actually. I really need to do some hobby. Seeing your output this week has been very inspiring. Great work.

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