All My Freinds Are Skeletons – Part 2

And with a final effort my shambling minions rise from their tombs.

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The ghouls are next (and hopefully won’t be such hard work) although I might treat myself to finishing off another undead character first.

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14 responses to “All My Freinds Are Skeletons – Part 2

  • imperialrebelork

    Very nice my man. That rust looo really is the Wudugast signature. The vibrant red is a great contrast too.

  • YES BOSS

    …and we beat the rhythm with their bones 😉

  • Alex

    Another brilliant batch mate, and yeah, IRO is spot on – that rust is amazing! I do have an issue with the idea of a skelly blowing a trumpet without the benefit of lungs & lips, (because ‘magic’ no doubt), but that is hardly your fault… the model itself is lovely, as is your painting – it probably just highlights the ridiculousness of my pedantry 🙂

    • Wudugast

      Aye, I’ve considered the question of the lungless horn-blower myself and my conclusions are; a) a skeleton drummer would be more feasible, but also super obvious. The horn blower is a lot more original so points there. b) perhaps a ghost dwells inside the horn (the ghost of the former hornist perhaps). The skeleton merely carries it around. c) the horn makes no sound, the skeleton has no means of blowing air through it after all. The dead are willed into battle by their vampire master who, conceited as he is, enjoys echoing the appearance of mortal soldiers in his undead puppets. The horn is therefore purely decorative, although its utter silence is somehow all the more haunting to those who must face these creatures in battle. d)It’s magic. Magic is the key component of an army of skeletons after all, who walk and fight without muscles or tendons, and who get stuck in about terrorising the populace when they should be mouldering in the earth. A little casual horn playing is nothing compared to all that.

      Can’t believe I got through all that horn-blowing without breaking out the innuendo, I must be losing my touch! 🙂

      • Alex

        :-)) – yeah, your logic is undeniable mate, the conceit of a vampire overlord does make particular sense. Most importantly, it is a really cool model, and is a great hook for casual innuendo. I am now totally fine with bony horners.

  • Remnante

    These are bloody lovely and right up my street. I’d love to see you tackle the zombie dragon!
    How on earth did you do that rust?

    • Wudugast

      Aye, the zombie dragon is one I’d like to tackle too. Maybe someday, for now I’m just trying to finish off what I’ve got.

      The rust effects are a bit of an odd bunch, there’s a whole load of experimental bits and bobs in there. Underneath it all is my old recipe for rust, from back when I first painted them; good old tin bitz drybrushed with boltgun metal. Then for those areas I’ve painted in more recent times (i.e. since my old pots of those dried up and bit the dust) a coat of ironbreaker, washed with agrax earthshade, then another wash of nuln oil, then typhus corrosion drybrushed with ryza rust in the really grotty bits. To me that always looks like badly cared for but essentially “current” weapons and armour (as used, for example, by an Ork or a Skaven). For the skellies I realised I wanted some of their kit to look like it had once been quite fancy, perhaps swords and shields which had been laid down as gravegoods or offerings, now tainted by unearthly magic. For these I used brass scorpion, highlighted with gehenna’s gold, then washed with waystone green. That came out looking a bit weird and garish so then I just repeated the ironbreaker-agrax earthshade combo over the worst areas to tone it down a little.

      For the really rusty stuff, like the guy at the bottom with the sword held aloft, I really went to town on shades of brown, sponged on a lot of orange, then added a few lines of ironbreaker anywhere I though the rust would be scuffed away by use. For the musician’s horn I tried everything I could think of and it just didn’t look right so in the end I went a bit crazy sponging on pretty much every colour listed above (plus a bit of nihilakh oxide in the cracks and grooves) until I was happy with it.

      Hope that helps! 🙂

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